The Bear Bulletin: Vol 7 (Deluxe Edition)

This is part of an ongoing series in which I round up a week’s worth of bear photos along with some thoughts on my photography.  You can find previous volumes of The Bear Bulletin here.


I played with our 16mm lens this week and had more fun shooting around than I have in a few months.  Perhaps due to my subjects?

The photos of Misty Bear and Nimbus were taken under our dining room table and the bears were so patient while I stuck my camera just inches from their perfect little faces.  The light was so interesting and I really enjoyed editing these photos.  I played around a lot with the warmth of some of Misty Bear’s photos to get more of a sepia feel. The afternoon had a very comfortable, lazy-day, feel to it.  I love my little ladies!

Are you ready for the “deluxe” part of The Bear Bulletin?  Take a deep breath and make sure you aren’t completely cute-d out.  Because your heart might explode.

You’re welcome.

Happy Caturday, friends.

The Bear Bulletin Vol. 3

This is part of an ongoing series in which I round up a week’s worth of bear photos along with some thoughts on my photography.  You can find previous bear bulletins here and here.


We’ve had a rough two weeks and the bears pulled their weight in snuggles.  Unfortunately I didn’t do as many photo shoots as in the previous bulletins, but perhaps that’s a good sign that I was taking the time to be present, and stay in the snuggle.  Photography-wise, I’ve gotten a lot more comfortable with aperture since the last Bear Bulletin.  This is due in part to product photography I did for sleep&sparkle and realizing that when the aperture number is low, the image I get looks like garbage when I try to clean it in photoshop.

In my first attempt, I used my 56mm prime lens and you can see that the scarf looks great at the exact point of focus but once I cut the image out in photoshop to lay it on a white background it looked like poorly done plastic surgery because of the blurriness of the rest of the object.  (I also did a bit of editing to color correct the scarf due to wonky lighting.)

IMG_9932
First effort: Fujifilm X-T20 with 56.0mm at f/1.2 (ISO 1600, 1/500).

Once I realized what was going on, I switched to my zoom lens (because I can be closer to the product) and increased the aperture.

IMG_9929
Second effort: Fujifilm X-T20 with 18.0mm at f/5.6 (ISO 1600, 1/45).

It’s nice to finish the week feeling like I have an understanding for one of the parameters in the camera.  I need to fidget with every single thing in isolation so that I get a deep understanding for what is happening, otherwise I feel like a monkey with a rocket ship.  I’ve started playing with the ISO and next week’s photos will talk a bit about that.  If you have favorite exercises you did to get a grasp on aperture, let me know in the comments. Now that I have an idea of what’s happening, I’m ready to practice for hours so that I can commit it to memory.

And now on to the bears!

And some shots from my phone for good measure…

Wishing you a fabulous Caturday and a great rest of the weekend!
-Michelle, Misty Bear, and Nimbus

The Bear Bulletin Vol. 2

Presenting Volume 2 of The Bear Bulletin! Please enjoy this first series titled “Bears on a Bed”, followed by the exuberantly colorful “Nimbus on a Chair.”

 

What do you think about the second series?  I played around with the saturation on the blanket and pillow quite a bit and in hindsight I think I overdid it.

My two favorite photos from this bear bulletin are the super alert Misty Bear, and Nimbus on her side looking straight at the camera. I love the composition, the color, the focus, just everything.

One Year of curious sparkle dirt

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk, if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” -Martin Luther King, Jr.

Flashback to January 2017. I knew I wanted to start a blog and I knew that my first post was going to be about “Hidden Figures.” What I didn’t know was EVERYTHING ELSE.

img_8077-1

I hadn’t been diagnosed with narcolepsy but I knew my grad school situation was untenable. I couldn’t hold down a 9-5 job 5 days/week so I took up substitute teaching and hoped that plus a record of my writing would be “good enough” for a future employer if I ever sorted out my health issues.

I had no idea that I would share my mental health history with the entire internet, post style files for all to see, and publicly embrace my maker personality and love of fashion in the form of a freakin’ accessories brand. OH! And go to Capitol Hill. This time last year I was at rock bottom. I thought things couldn’t get any worse so why not just put all of me out there? Because if one person read my blog, got a sleep study, and found an answer sooner than I did, it would all be worth it. (Sleep posts here.) I could never have guessed in a million years that 2017 would be the best year of my life. (Aside from that year I met my husband!)

Thank you for coming along for the ride! And for putting up with these gratitude recap posts every month because every month last year was a major milestone for me and I’m still processing!

Love,

The Narcolepsy Princess

Sewing, style, and sleep: interviewed by “The Daily Sew”

I met Mary in the Style School alum group but I KNEW of Mary and her inspiring Daily Sew blog long before that.  Mary’s post about Stasia’s Style School is actually one of the things that led me to pull the trigger and sign up for Style School after years of internet stalking Stasia and sinking into a grad school-induced style hell.  I had an idea of Style School that was girly and frivolous (read: I made up lame excuses to not do it because I was so scared about what might happen if I reconnected to old and powerful parts of my personality!) so Mary’s post made me rethink everything: if a bad-ass, feminist / activist / maker / guru can go through this and come out better for it, then sign me up.

The gorgeous Mary Sigler!

I was incredibly honored that Mary interviewed me this past month for “The Daily Sew” after buying her first SLEEP&SPARKLE headscarf and then finding out that I sew them myself.  We talked about sewing, style, and sleep.  But first, check out a few of my favorite posts on The Daily Sew:


And now on to the interview

Rocking a thrifted purse, grandma’s necklace, and a SLEEP&SPARKLE headscarf.

Mary: I love your style. Can you give us some insight to how it represents you?

Me: I grew up around a lot of color. My mom and grandmother were both fiber artists and there were no rules about playing with my grandmother’s fabric. I was allowed to play and make mistakes with it.

I was a gypsy for Halloween for so many years using the fabrics and costume jewelry from my grandmother.

My mom always bought fabric with a project in mind so her stash was off limits but my grandma had no rules. Her philosophy was to buy what she loved and then maybe make something from it. And being an immigrant she kept everything.

You sewed from a young age?

Well, I grew up on handwork, mostly tatting and learning Belgian bobbin lace making. Sewing came later.

Tatting with two shuttles can be a lot to manage, but it’s still easier than trying to make and fit a pair of pants, which is why that is something that I have never done to date.

What did you like about handwork?

Tatting is repetitive and easy to pick up and put down. You can start and stop in the middle. Sewing takes more steps which can make me antsy; it’s the transitions that sewing has. There’s sewing, reading the instructions, pressing. I got distracted and sleepy. So when I sewed I stuck to fast projects like simple patterns.

I love draping though, it’s relatively easy and stimulating. You can pick it up and see immediately the change in front of you.

When did you learn to sew?

When I was about seven or eight I took a class that my grandmother taught at G Street Fabrics (A most awesome DC metro area store). I think we made backpacks.

My grandmother had a huge influence on me even after we moved away from her. When she would come to visit she would stay awhile. And we would spend the summers with her. She’s very creative.

What’s your sewing style?

I am somewhere in between my mom and my grandmother when it comes to collecting fabric. Sometimes I buy with a vision of making something particular and sometimes I buy because I’m drawn to it.

Sewing in straight lines is my jam!

I actually wear a lot of things from my grandmother and mother. Their hand-made hand-me-downs. My mom was an engineer when it came to sewing. She would make clothes out of striped fabrics and ALL of her stripes matched exactly.

I’m 25% Armenian, through my grandma Armistice (born on Armistice day and married on July 4.  The proudest American you will ever meet!).  My great grandma, Adele, used to make bobbin lace by moonlight in Syria, before emigrating to America to flea the genocide.
Why yes I wear sunglasses inside if it completes a look.  #styleschoolskills And yes, this is the rainbow stripe coat that my mother made, where she matched every stripe that could possible be matched, including on the breast pocket.  No, I would never set out to do something like this.

 

What do you enjoy about sewing?

I don’t like making clothes. Maybe if I draped them to make the fit better I would like sewing clothes more.

But I love making crafts – totes, headscarves, quilts.  I love being able  to say “I made this.” It is nice to be surrounded by things that  are consistent with my values. To be able to set aside the time to make something; to follow through on the intention, to express my creativity. To say to myself, “I’m setting out to do something besides watching television.” I want to sit down and finish something. I want to be cloaked in my values.

So you are making something lately. Something cloaked in your values. Tell us about your new company, Sleep & Sparkle. What is it and how did you come up with the idea for it?

The idea behind SLEEP&SPARKLE is to make creative, comfortable head accessories that help people express themselves.

It started back in April when I posted a story on Instagram of a headscarf I made with a wire insert: “Look what I did with wire”. People asked “Wait. What did you do?”. They seemed to like it and I had always thought if I got my act together I would open an etsy shop.

I had just been diagnosed with narcolepsy. I had extended my medical leave of absence from graduate school because I wasn’t sure how I would do on the medication. Well, the medication seem to have immediate effect. Suddenly I had more free time; time when I wasn’t sleeping. And so I quickly sewed up 30 of these wired head scarves and mailed them out to the women who had seen the first one I made.

I got positive feedback on the prototypes so suddenly, whenever I was awake it was “get out of my way, I have work to do!” I don’t ever remember a time before starting narcolepsy treatment when I had this much wakefulness, and this ability to follow through. After starting treatment I was either working on making the website or the scarves.

A particularly triumphant day.  Wearing one of my favorite SLEEP&SPARKLE headscarves after a meeting with somebody at the University of Virginia’s student health clinic, where they agreed to let me write a brochure on sleep disorders to promote awareness among students AND practitioners.

The narcolepsy story is really interesting and a big part of your story. Do you mind sharing?

I’ve had narcolepsy since I was about 7 or 8 years old. It was only just properly diagnosed this February, and I started treatment in April. I never knew what it was like to feel normal. Activism for mental health and chronic health are really important to me because I went misdiagnosed and mismedicated for 20 years. I want to increase awareness about sleep disorders because they are extremely hard to diagnose and frequently mistaken for  mental health issues like ADD/ADHD, depression, bipolar disorder, and even schizophrenia.

My number one message on this topic to everybody is that you know your body better than anybody else; better than any doctor, and you are the only one who knows if something is truly wrong. I want every person to feel empowered to fight for their health and for proper care and it starts with us learning that we are trustworthy and that our bodies are trustworthy. and. We are worthy and deserve to fight for a healthy life which can be a tough message to internalize for people with rare and orphan illnesses that doctors are not familiar with.

Wearing a shirt created by Prisca Kim after her son JJ wore this sign during the Women’s March: I HEART NAPS BUT I STAY WOKE.  Find them here.

Thank you all so much for reading! Be sure to follow the “The Daily Sew” and you can find Mary on instagram @thedailysew and on Facebook @dailysew.

If you are interested in learning more about tatting or Belgian bobbin lace, you can find a teacher near you by contacting the International Organization of Lace, Inc, of which I was a proud, card-carrying member until my grandma stopped paying our dues.

And if you’d like to talk about sleep, please use the contact form on my blog to send me an email, or DM me on instagram @curioussparkledirt or on my Facebook page @curioussparkledirt.